Change of Time Verbs and Adverbs

Begin, End, Stop, Start, Continue, Proceed, Already, Yet, Still, Anymore, etc. “You can continue to enjoy speaking with me.” This presupposes that you are already enjoying speaking to me. “Are you still interested in getting involved in business with me?” This presupposes that you were interested in getting involved in business with me in the past.

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Stories

“You know it is funny you mention Florida. I took my entire family down their last year and we absolutely had a blast. Did you ever notice that sometimes with a new experience, you really feel compelled to get the most out of it that you possibly can? Well, we drove down in our van and it […]

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Quotes

This pattern involves making any statement you want to make to another person as if you are reporting in quotes what someone else said at another time and  place. “As you begin to see the value of this proposition, you will come to the same conclusion that a customer came to the other day, and that was […]

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Extended Sentence

This kind of pattern is created by putting two sentences together that end and begin with the same word. “I know that this is something you will like me, enjoy it.” Here the word “like” is the end of the first sentence,

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Sound Alike-Different Meaning

Words that sound alike but have different meanings create another way that causes the person to have to process what you are actually saying either consciously or unconsciously. Such words include: • Right/ Write/ Rite • I / Eye • Insecurity / In Security • Red / Read • There/ Their / They’re • Weight/ Wait • Knows/ […]

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Multiplicity of Meaning

This occurs when one sentence, phrase, or word has more than one possible meaning. “Multiplicity of Meaning is an important tool that can result in a mild confusion and disorientation which is useful in inducing altered states.” Anytime you can makes it possible for the listener to internally process a message in more than one way, you require […]

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Responsive Questioning

Responsive Questioning are yes/ no questions that typically bring out a response rather than a literal answer. For example, if you approach someone on the street and ask, “Do you have the time?” the person generally won’t say “yes” or “no.” She will tell you what time it is. If you ask someone “Do you know what’s on […]

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Commentary Adjectives and Adverbs

Fortunately, Naturally, Luckily, Innocently, Happily, Necessarily, etc. “Fortunately, there’s no need for me to know the details of what you want in order for me to help you get it.” “Naturally, you will begin to see the value of what I am saying to you right now”! “Luckily, you have met me today, because I can help […]

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Brain Twister Story

“Did I ever tell you about my brother, Chris? It seems he was at this golf outing, and he was at the bar called the 19th hole. And the bartender was telling a story about his buddy who had two brothers. One was really good at dealing with people, but the other had problems until he met this […]

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Effective Trigger Components

Intensity of the state accessed • Access state fully and intensely. • Associate into the state. • Seeing what you are seeing. • Hearing what you are hearing. • Feeling what you are feeling. Purity of the state • One specific set of feelings or emotional state. Timing of the Trigger • Start the trigger […]

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Setting Potent Triggers (Stimulus Response Conditioning)

Have you ever heard a song from when you were back in High School or College, or maybe it was the song that you and a former girlfriend or boyfriend shared? When you hear the song, a flood of emotions, memories and recollections come back immediately as if you were back in the day. Everyone experiences these […]

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Suggestive Phrases

Here is a basic list of suggestive phrases without the other elements added. You can use a template to add the presuppositions, embedded commands and any other elements.  These phrases themselves cause a semi-hypnotic state due to the processing that must take place to respond. I don’t want you to be… I want you to learn… I know you […]

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Suggestive Statements with Presuppositions

The following are patterns that were put together by combining a “suggestive statement” (in red) with a pattern that contains presuppositions, embedded commands, and others that have been discussed. It is suggested that you take each of these and work on them for your own area of learning suggestive language. You will notice that most are from […]

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Sleight of Mouth

The concept of Sleight of Mouth came from Robert Dilts who observed and then modeled the persuasion skills of Richard Bandler, co-founder of NLP. Dilts was able to develop the Sleight of Mouth patterns as a result of discovering the methods Bandler and other famous communicators used in their day-to-day communication. While there are several […]

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Metaphor Patterns

Metaphors are used extensively in storytelling, song lyrics and poetry. They can also be used effectively in business communication to illustrate complex points. Speaking in metaphorical terms is a very powerful way of getting your message across, both in hypnosis and in everyday communication. Metaphorical communication causes the listener to relate to the subject of […]

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Non Sequiturs

A non sequitur is a statement presented in the form of ’cause leads to effect’, A > B, but where there is in fact no logical connection between A and B. The structure of the statement fools the listener by starting with a statement of something that is true and then specifying an outcome that […]

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Negative Suggestions

Negative suggestions are similar to conversational postulates in that they ask for one thing but really expect a different behavior. The Milton Model works because the unconscious mind does not deal with negatives well, and tends to ignore the words ‘don’t and not’ and instead focuses on the object of the sentence. The sentence ‘Don’t […]

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Extended Quotation

If you attribute a suggestion to someone else this can avoid a lot of resistance from the client. By using one or more levels of quotation you can say almost anything to the client, and will probably confuse the unconscious mind in the process, making the suggestion more likely to be accepted. Milton Erickson once […]

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Cause and Effect implied

Cause and Effect implied is when a person makes a statement that implies that one thing causes another, or states that one thing is true, therefore the next thing must be true. The statement may be untrue, or there may be no direct link between the one thing and the other. ‘And knowing that you […]

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Analogical Marking

Analogical marking is one way of applying the Milton Model. Analogical Marking delivers hypnotic commands hidden inside normal speech as part of a conversational induction. Milton Erickson discovered that he could mix hypnotic commands into an ordinary conversation and have someone act on them provided the command words were subtly different in some way. This […]

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Unspecific Verbs

Unspecific verbs sound good yet are hard to pin down. They are similar to the unspecific objects in the Milton Model. The unconscious mind accepts the word in context and supplies its own meaning. Words such as ‘wonder, change, understand, think, feel’ etc., are non-specific and can apply to anything. ‘and you may be wondering about […]

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Unspecific Objects

Unspecific Objects are words that sound important but are actually quite vague and open to interpretation. Milton Model words such as ‘learnings, outcomes, resources, findings, consideration’ etc., can be used to ground almost any topic, which makes the suggestion much stronger. By using inclusive words the client finds closure from their own resources. If you […]

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Information Asymmetry

In contract theory and economics, information asymmetry deals with the study of decisions in transactions where one party has more or better information than the other. In contrast to neo-classical economics which assumes perfect information, this is about “What We Don’t Know”. This creates an imbalance of power in transactions which can sometimes cause the transactions […]

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Conversational Postulates

Conversational Postulates are requests for action or information masquerading as yes or no questions.  It is a question which, on the face of it, requires a Yes or No answer, but which is really demanding a specific behavior. ‘Could you pass me the cream?’ is a request for action, not an inquiry about ability. ‘Do you […]

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Mind Reading

Mind Reading occurs when someone assumes they know what another person is thinking or feeling without direct evidence.  Mind Reading can be recognized when someone claims to know something without obvious evidence, claims to know how another person feels, or claims to understand another person’s internal state without explanation. It is the assumptions that are made about […]

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Nominalization Chaining

Nominalization Chaining is when several nominalizations are used or chained together as though what is being said is a real and understood concept.

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Nominalizations

Nominalizations occur when a verb or adjective is used as a noun although not a real and tangible object. This can include such words as accuracy, superiority, excellence, and destiny. “People can come to new understandings.” In this example ‘understandings’ is used as a noun and to describe the on-going experience of ‘understanding’ or ‘making […]

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Distortions

Distortions is the manipulation of the meaning of real events resulting in a false conclusion that is based on a persons actual sensory information. Coincidences in events can lead some people to create distortions of reality. In language, a distortion can be expressed in such examples as “A black car followed me all the way […]

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Lack of Referential Index

Lack of Referential Index is a type of language “deletion” where there is an unspecified group of people or an unknown “they” in the statement, such as “everyone knows you like to eat ice cream” or “they said you were too busy to go”.

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Modal Operators

Modal Operators is when language implies a “must” when there is no requirement for one. Using Modal Operators limits options and remove choices, such as “I must win this competition”, “you must buy this jacket or you will be cold” or “You must resolve this issue.” Modal Operators imply things could happen or must happen. Common Milton […]

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Universal Quantifiers

Universal Quantifiers are universal generalizations without referential index. They are statements that include an all or nothing type of generalization, such as “this always does that” or “every time I do that, then this happens”. The Milton Model uses statements with words such as ‘all, every, always, never, any, everybody, nobody, no one‘ that act to […]

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