Change of Time Verbs and Adverbs

Begin, End, Stop, Start, Continue, Proceed, Already, Yet, Still, Anymore, etc. “You can continue to enjoy speaking with me.” This presupposes that you are already enjoying speaking to me. “Are you still interested in getting involved in business with me?” This presupposes that you were interested in getting involved in business with me in the past.

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Stories

“You know it is funny you mention Florida. I took my entire family down their last year and we absolutely had a blast. Did you ever notice that sometimes with a new experience, you really feel compelled to get the most out of it that you possibly can? Well, we drove down in our van and it […]

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Quotes

This pattern involves making any statement you want to make to another person as if you are reporting in quotes what someone else said at another time and  place. “As you begin to see the value of this proposition, you will come to the same conclusion that a customer came to the other day, and that was […]

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Extended Sentence

This kind of pattern is created by putting two sentences together that end and begin with the same word. “I know that this is something you will like me, enjoy it.” Here the word “like” is the end of the first sentence,

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Sound Alike-Different Meaning

Words that sound alike but have different meanings create another way that causes the person to have to process what you are actually saying either consciously or unconsciously. Such words include: • Right/ Write/ Rite • I / Eye • Insecurity / In Security • Red / Read • There/ Their / They’re • Weight/ Wait • Knows/ […]

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Multiplicity of Meaning

This occurs when one sentence, phrase, or word has more than one possible meaning. “Multiplicity of Meaning is an important tool that can result in a mild confusion and disorientation which is useful in inducing altered states.” Anytime you can makes it possible for the listener to internally process a message in more than one way, you require […]

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Responsive Questioning

Responsive Questioning are yes/ no questions that typically bring out a response rather than a literal answer. For example, if you approach someone on the street and ask, “Do you have the time?” the person generally won’t say “yes” or “no.” She will tell you what time it is. If you ask someone “Do you know what’s on […]

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Commentary Adjectives and Adverbs

Fortunately, Naturally, Luckily, Innocently, Happily, Necessarily, etc. “Fortunately, there’s no need for me to know the details of what you want in order for me to help you get it.” “Naturally, you will begin to see the value of what I am saying to you right now”! “Luckily, you have met me today, because I can help […]

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Brain Twister Story

“Did I ever tell you about my brother, Chris? It seems he was at this golf outing, and he was at the bar called the 19th hole. And the bartender was telling a story about his buddy who had two brothers. One was really good at dealing with people, but the other had problems until he met this […]

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Effective Trigger Components

Intensity of the state accessed • Access state fully and intensely. • Associate into the state. • Seeing what you are seeing. • Hearing what you are hearing. • Feeling what you are feeling. Purity of the state • One specific set of feelings or emotional state. Timing of the Trigger • Start the trigger […]

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Setting Potent Triggers (Stimulus Response Conditioning)

Have you ever heard a song from when you were back in High School or College, or maybe it was the song that you and a former girlfriend or boyfriend shared? When you hear the song, a flood of emotions, memories and recollections come back immediately as if you were back in the day. Everyone experiences these […]

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Suggestive Phrases

Here is a basic list of suggestive phrases without the other elements added. You can use a template to add the presuppositions, embedded commands and any other elements.  These phrases themselves cause a semi-hypnotic state due to the processing that must take place to respond. I don’t want you to be… I want you to learn… I know you […]

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Suggestive Statements with Presuppositions

The following are patterns that were put together by combining a “suggestive statement” (in red) with a pattern that contains presuppositions, embedded commands, and others that have been discussed. It is suggested that you take each of these and work on them for your own area of learning suggestive language. You will notice that most are from […]

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Unspecified Verbs

No verb is completely specified, but verbs can be more or less specified. They mentally get them to think of exactly what you want to get across. If you use relatively unspecified verbs, the listener is again forced to supply the meaning in order to understand the sentence. Words like: Do, Fix, Solve, Move, Change, Feel, Wonder, Think, […]

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Metaphor Patterns

Metaphors are used extensively in storytelling, song lyrics and poetry. They can also be used effectively in business communication to illustrate complex points. Speaking in metaphorical terms is a very powerful way of getting your message across, both in hypnosis and in everyday communication. Metaphorical communication causes the listener to relate to the subject of […]

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Indirect Elicitation Patterns

Indirect elicitation literally means getting a specific response without overtly asking for that response.  Direct elicitation is often seen as being very blunt or authoritarian, whereas indirect elicitation is a way of softening up your communication. Indirect elicitation patterns elicit a desired response indirectly; asking for an outcome without making it obvious that a) you […]

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Inverse Meta Model

The Inverse Meta Model language patterns are used to describe experience in vague terms. The Inverse Meta Model language patterns can be broken into three distinct classes: Deleting Information, Semantic Ill-Formedness Limits of the Speaker’s Model Deleting Information Where information is deleted, the listener must fill in the deleted information from their own unique experience. […]

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Non Sequiturs

A non sequitur is a statement presented in the form of ’cause leads to effect’, A > B, but where there is in fact no logical connection between A and B. The structure of the statement fools the listener by starting with a statement of something that is true and then specifying an outcome that […]

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Negative Suggestions

Negative suggestions are similar to conversational postulates in that they ask for one thing but really expect a different behavior. The Milton Model works because the unconscious mind does not deal with negatives well, and tends to ignore the words ‘don’t and not’ and instead focuses on the object of the sentence. The sentence ‘Don’t […]

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Inanimations

Inanimations are Milton Model statements that assign feelings or actions to things that cannot have any. Technically these are called Selectional Restriction Violations. A sofa cannot think, a plant cannot talk, but sentences can be constructed that sound that way and because our minds are specially tuned to metaphor, this type of suggestion will be […]

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Confusion Inducing Questions

What’s something really important that you’re just not thinking about right now? If there’s no future in the past should you forget this tomorrow? When can you continue to change if you’re about to decide that isn’t now a good time? What wouldn’t happen if you didn’t? How do you find that? Where does that […]

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Negative Commands

But – negates any words that are stated before it If – presupposes that you may not Would have – past tense that draws attention to things that didn’t actually happen. Should have – past tense that draws attention to things that didn’t actually happen (implies guilt) Could have – past tense that draws attention […]

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Intension

In linguistics, logic, philosophy, and other fields, an intension is any property or quality connoted by a word, phrase, or another symbol. In the case of a word, the word’s definition often implies an intension. The term may also refer to all such intensions collectively, although the term comprehension is technically more correct for this. […]

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Leading Question

A leading question or suggestive interrogation is a question that suggests the particular answer or contains the information the examiner is looking to have confirmed. Their use is restricted in eliciting testimony in court, to reduce the ability of the examiner to direct or influence the evidence presented. Depending on the circumstances, leading questions can be […]

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False in one thing, false in everything

The Latin phrase falsum in uno, falsum in omnibus which, roughly translated, means “false in one thing, false in everything“, is fallacious in so far as someone found to be wrong about one thing, is presumed to be wrong about some other thing entirely. Arising in Roman courts, this principle meant that if a witness was […]

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Splitting

Splitting (also called all-or-nothing thinking) is the failure in a person’s thinking to bring together both positive and negative qualities of the self and others into a cohesive, realistic whole. It is a common defense mechanism used by many people. The individual tends to think in extremes (i.e., an individual’s actions and motivations are all good […]

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Black-and-white thinking

In psychology, a phenomenon related to the false dilemma is black-and-white thinking. Many people routinely engage in black-and-white thinking, an example of which is someone who labels other people as all good or all bad. See also: Splitting (psychology)

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False Choice

The presentation of a false choice often reflects a deliberate attempt to eliminate the middle ground on an issue. A common argument against noise pollution laws involves a false choice. It might be argued that in New York City noise should not be regulated, because if it were, the city would drastically change in a […]

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Morton’s Fork

Morton’s Fork, a choice between two equally unpleasant options, is often a false dilemma. The phrase originates from an argument for taxing English nobles: “Either the nobles of this country appear wealthy, in which case they can be taxed for good; or they appear poor, in which case they are living frugally and must have […]

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False Dilemma

A false dilemma (also called black-and/or-white thinking, bifurcation, denying a conjunct, the either-or fallacy, false dichotomy, fallacy of exhaustive hypotheses, the fallacy of false choice, the fallacy of the false alternative, or the fallacy of the excluded middle) is a type of informal fallacy that involves a situation in which limited alternatives are considered, when […]

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Presuppositions: Suggestive Questions

A Suggestive Question is one that implies that a certain answer should be given in response, or falsely presents a presupposition in the question as accepted fact. Such a question distorts the memory thereby tricking the person into answering in a specific way that might or might not be true or consistent with their actual […]

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Presuppositions: Complex Question Fallacy

A complex question fallacy or loaded question is a question which contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt). Aside from being an informal fallacy depending on usage, such questions may be used as a rhetorical tool: the question attempts to limit direct replies to be those that serve the questioner’s agenda. The traditional example is the question “Have you stopped beating […]

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Presuppositions: Loaded Question

A loaded question or complex question fallacy is a question which contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt). Aside from being an informal fallacy depending on usage, such questions may be used as a rhetorical tool: the question attempts to limit direct replies to be those that serve the questioner’s agenda. The […]

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Assumption

Assumption is the act of assuming, or taking to or upon one’s self; the act of taking up or adopting. His assumption of secretarial duties was timely. The act of taking for granted, or supposing a thing without proof; a supposition; an unwarrantable claim. Their assumption of his guilt disqualified them from jury duty.

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Presuppositions: Performative Contradiction

A performative contradiction arises when the propositional content of a statement contradicts the presuppositions of asserting it. An example of a performative contradiction is the statement “I am dead” because the very act of proposing it presupposes the actor is alive. Performative contradictions The statement “Don’t do as I do, do as I say” is arguably […]

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Exception that proves the rule

“The exception [that] proves the rule” means that the presence of an exception applying to a specific case establishes (“proves”) that a general rule exists. For example, a sign that says “parking prohibited on Sundays” (the exception) “proves” that parking is allowed on the other six days of the week (the rule). A more explicit […]

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Presumption

In the law of evidence, a presumption of a particular fact can be made without the aid of proof in some situations. The types of presumption includes a rebuttable discretionary presumption, a rebuttable mandatory presumption, and an irrebuttable or conclusive presumption. Presumptions are sometimes categorized into two types: presumptions without basic facts, and presumptions with […]

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Presuppositions: Comparisons and Contrasts

Comparisons and contrasts may be marked by stress (or by other prosodic means), by particles like “too”, or by comparatives constructions. Mary called Albert a male chauvinist, and then HE insulted HER. Comparisons and Contrast: For Mary to call Albert a male chauvinist would be to insult him. Cindy is a better linguist than Becky. Comparisons and […]

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Presuppositions: Cleft Sentences

Cleft construction: It was Howard that kissed Sarah. Cleft Sentence: Someone kissed Sarah. Pseudo-cleft construction: What Tim lost was his wallet. Cleft Sentence: Tim lost something.

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Presuppositions: Temporal Clauses

Before Derek was even born, Thomas noticed presuppositions. Temporal Clause: Derek was born. While Kensington was revolutionizing linguistics, the rest of social science was asleep. Temporal Clause: Kensington was revolutionizing linguistics. Since Kennedy died, we’ve lacked a leader. Temporal Clause: Kennedy died. Further temporal clause constructors: after; during; whenever; as (as in As Tom was getting up, he slipped).

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Presuppositions: Iteratives

The men in black came again. Iterative: The men in black came before. You can’t get jelly beans anymore. Iterative: You once could get jelly beans. Wellington returned to power. Iterative: Wellington held power before. Further iteratives: another time; to come back; restore; repeat; for the nth time.

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Presupposition: Change of State Verbs

Todd stopped teasing his wife. Change of State Verb: Todd had been teasing his wife. Mindy began teasing her husband. Change of State Verb: Mindy hadn’t been teasing her husband. Some further change of state verbs: start; finish; carry on; cease; take (as in X took Y from Z » Y was at/in/with Z); leave; enter; come; go; arrive; etc.

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Presupposition: Implicative Verbs

Andrew managed to open the door. Implicative Verb: Andrew tried to open the door. Dennis forgot to lock the door. Implicative Verb: Dennis ought to have locked, or intended to lock, the door. Some further implicative predicates: X happened to V Implicative Verb: X didn’t plan or intend to V X avoided V’ing Implicative Verb: X was expected to, or usually did, or ought […]

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Presupposition: Definite Descriptions

Definite Descriptions are phrases of the form “the X” where X is a noun phrase. The description is said to be proper when the phrase applies to exactly one object, and conversely, it is said to be improper when either more than one potential referents exists, as in “the senator from Ohio”, or none at […]

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Presuppositions: Factive Verbs

On this definition, for someone to know X, it is required that X be true. A linguistic question thus arises regarding the usage of such phrases: does a person who states “John knows X” implicitly claim the truth of X? Steven Pinker explored this question in a 2007 book on language and cognition, using a widely […]

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Presuppositions: Punctuation

Punctuation is unexpected yet does not ‘follow the rules’, i.e. improper pauses, connected sentences, incomplete sentences – all of which ultimately force the listener to interpreter or ‘mind read’ what the speaker is saying in an attempt to understand. “Hand me your watch how quickly you go into a deep sleep.”

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